Paulton Edwards breathing life into big back TVs

June 27, 2022
Although he enjoys repairing all kinds of television, Paulton Edwards has a special love for the big back sets.
Although he enjoys repairing all kinds of television, Paulton Edwards has a special love for the big back sets.
Paulton Edwards has been fixing appliances for the past 40 years.
Paulton Edwards has been fixing appliances for the past 40 years.
1
2

Paulton Edwards has been breathing life into back television sets, which most would consider dinosaurs in this day and age where smart TVs are common.

The 66-year-old technician has found much satisfaction in the job he has been doing for the past 40 years .

"My father never want me stay in the yard and get caught up with what was happening in the community, so him carry me to a place down on Church Street, King's Radio and Television, and there I learnt the trade. The first day I went down there and I saw all the TVs, I was so excited," Edwards shared, his eyes beaming with pride.

He started as an apprentice in 1974 and spent the next 14 years at the company repairing televisions, irons, fans and radios before switching channels to start his own business on Spanish Town Road. When THE STAR visited his workshop on the weekend, Edwards was steep in concentration as he fixed a radio.

His shop was laden with fully functioning rear projection TVs, known properly as big back televisions, as well as microwaves, kettles and radios, waiting to be picked up by their owners. Edwards explained that in recent times, since the 2000s, there has been a decline in the number of big back televisions he is contracted to fix. But, when the jobs are presented, he is excited.

"Yea man, people still carry them to fix. Up to yesterday me fix two. People still have big back TVs, but I get more flat screens," the electrician said.

He told THE STAR that although he enjoys repairing all kinds of television, he has a special love for the big back sets.

"Why I love the big back, it is what I have been doing for so long, so I get used to it, and I have a whole heap a knowledge in it, and I have understanding in it," Edwards said.

"The big back is better than the flat screen because it gives longer service, and secondly, if this TV should drop off the table, it nuh muss damage nothing than shake the circuit board, but if a flat screen drop, the whole panel gone," Edwards said.

The father-of-eight demonstrated the process of effecting repairs on the television sets. First, he removed the screws, which revealed a complex yet intriguing system that operates the television. He noted that the common mishaps happen mostly with flyback, a vital piece that pushes voltage through the system, ultimately showing the signals on screen in pictures.

"If it has something to do with the sound now coming out, then it has something to do with the condenser. If it not picking up signal, maybe you have a weak antenna," Edwards shared.

A repair, he said, attracts a service charge of $2,500 and jobs take a maximum of one week to be completed.

Meanwhile, the electrician told THE STAR that he has not been able to find an apprentice in the past eight years, indicating that young people are not willing to learn the skill. The Tivoli Gardens resident stressed that he has no intention of leaving his workshop soon. He said that he has been adapting to the technological advances of the 21st century and this has allowed him to be able to repair modern-day electrical appliances and equipment.

"You don't stop learning. I keep reading and studying schematic diagrams, I enjoy doing it," said Edwards, while adding that he feels good when he completes a job and "see how the TV shows pretty".

Other News Stories